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Maximizing Battery life and Lifespan

“Battery life” is the amount of time your device runs before it needs to be recharged. “Battery lifespan” is the amount of time your battery lasts until it needs to be replaced. Maximize both and you’ll get the most out of your Apple devices, no matter which ones you own.

Keep it away from extreme temperatures.

Your device is designed to perform well in a wide range of temperatures, with 62° to 72° F (16° to 22° C) as the ideal comfort zone. It’s especially important to avoid exposing your device to temperatures higher than 95° F (35° C), which can permanently damage battery capacity. That is, your battery won’t power your device as long on a given charge. Charging the device in high temperatures can damage it further. Even storing a battery in a hot environment can damage it irreversibly. When using your device in a very cold environment, you may notice a decrease in battery life, but this condition is temporary. Once the battery’s temperature returns to its normal operating range, its performance will return to normal as well.

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(Source: apple.com)

Bacon vs. Sex: 43% Of Canadians Prefer The Pork

According to a survey conducted by Maple Leaf Foods Inc., when presented with the options of bacon and sex, 43% of Canadians say they’d opt for the bacon. And when asked to rank a series of aromas in order of preference, 23% of men ranked the smell of bacon first.

Other findings of questionable utility, according to Maple Leaf’s survey:

When asked if they are good lovers, four out of five respondents (82%) who said they love bacon, also said they are good lovers. And when asked if they are romantic, four out of five respondents (81%) who said they love bacon also agreed they are romantic.

It should be noted that the survey was commissioned by Maple Leaf in conjunction with the release of their new “Reclosable Bacon” line, and the statistical methods and reliability of the poll are both undisclosed and unknown.

Why do competitors open their stores next to one another? - Jac de Haan

Why are all the gas stations, cafes and restaurants in one crowded spot? As two competitive cousins vie for ice-cream-selling domination on one small beach, discover how game theory and the Nash Equilibrium inform these retail hotspots.

Lesson by Jac de Haan, animation by Luke Rowsell.

(Source: ed.ted.com)

The Subway Spa

For our latest mission, we turned a very hot New York City subway platform into an unauthorized luxury spa. NYC’s un-air-conditioned platforms can feel like a sauna in the summer, so we figured we might as well embrace the heat. Our spa’s complimentary services included infused water, towels, sauna benches (already provided by the MTA), hot stone massage, and a human-powered steam room misting station. Random New Yorkers were encouraged to join our performers and use the services and quite a few took us up on it.

(Source: improveverywhere.com)

Should Taxes Be Higher? It’s the million dollar question! Up? Down? No change? Where in the world should taxes go? In election years, the question of tax rates fills the airwaves. In non-election years, the question of tax rates, again, fills the airwaves. So what’s the answer? UCLA Professor of Economics Tim Groseclose explains his research on the topic. Basically, there’s a certain point at which higher tax rates actually reduce the amount of revenue the government collects. What’s that point? When are tax rates too high? Learn a valuable lesson in economics, and public policy.

Built into the foundation of free enterprise is a promise. It’s a promise that no other economic system offers. This promise has a great deal to do with your sense of well-being, that is, your happiness. George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton understood this. So does renowned social scientist, Arthur Brooks. In five minutes, he explains how happiness and free enterprise are marvelously entwined.

How the Smartest Leaders Handle Risk (And So Should You)

8 Tips from a successful entrepreneur and race car driver.

I spend a lot of time wondering about risk—when to take a chance and when to play it safe. I tend to dislike risk, so this is a tough subject for me.

When Tom Panaggio, co-founder of Direct Mail Express (DME), which now employs about 400 people, published The Risk Advantage, I knew I had to talk to him. “I didn’t set out to write about risk,” he says. “I wanted to write a book applicable to small businesses and entrepreneurs.”

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